Category Archives: Fashion

Gabriela Hearst’s Prize-Winning Fall Collection Will Make You Reconsider Wool

Taking home a prize-winning piece of fashion just got easier: Gabriela Hearst won the Fall 2017 International Woolmark Prize for womenswear and the collection has landed exclusively at MyTheresa (shop it here). Encompassing pieces as varied as a trench coat and one-piece long johns, the entire range is linked by a common factor: wool. It’s not your grandmother’s knit, though; Hearst was a virtuoso, using fabrications like luxurious, ultrafine Merino wool and a wool-velvet hybrid.

“The idea was to show the ultra luxury side of wool and create desirability,” Hearst told ELLE.com, explaining that the idea of wool as a scratchy, bulky fabric is outdated. “Merino wool is extremely soft and can even be knitted so that it’s lighter than cashmere. They’re as thin as second-skin and can you warm and cool.”

Unlike some collections crafted for the runway or industry review that consumers never see, every piece of Hearst’s prize-winning line-up was bought by retailers. Along with MyTheresa, shoppers can find it at luxe stores in Dubai, London, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and others.

Hearst’s muse for fall is highly specific: WWII Italian journalist and writer Oriana Fallaci. “She interviewed the main political figures of her time, including Indira Gandhi, Yasser Araft, Ali Buto, Golda Meir, Henry Kissinger, and the Ayatollah Khomeini. She was never scared of asking the tough questions and was impossibly stylish.”

André Leon Talley’s Documentary Will Perform at the Toronto International Film Festival

The 2017 Toronto International Film Festival is quickly approaching and we have another must-see film to add to our watch list: André Leon Talley’s documentary.

Called The Gospel According to André, the 94-minute film will make its official premiere at TIFF 2017 on Sept. 8, with Magnolia Pictures planning a spring 2018 North American theatrical release. Directed by Kate Novack, the “funny and poignant portrait” will chronicle the life of the 67-year-old former Vogue editor-at-large, and will include archival footage of André’s illustrious career, starting with his involvement in Andy Warhol’s Factory during the ’70s, according to WWD.

“André has been an unmissable fixture in the front row of fashion for as long as I can remember, but the story of how he got there has never really been told in an intimate way,” Novack explained to WWD.

Of course, plenty of fashion luminaries will be present, including Anna Wintour, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Valentino and Manolo Blahnik. It will also touch on two important women in Talley’s life: his grandmother, Bennie Frances Davis, a maid on Duke’s campus who raised André with a strong sense of discipline and Diana Vreeland, who took him on as an assistant for a 1974 Metropolitan Museum of Art fashion exhibit and helped launch his career.

Talley, himself, describes the flick as his “journey in the chiffon trenches,” and said the firs take of the film was “glorious.”

Talley’s film isn’t the only fashion documentary coming out this September — Manolo Blahnik’s documentary, Manolo: The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards, is set to release Sept. 15, while Zac Posen’s documentary, House of Z, will premiere Sept. 6 exclusively on Vogue.com. Dries Van Noten will also have his own documentary called Dries, though no release date has been confirmed yet.

Planning To Start A Store Business Store

Opening a fashion retail outlet is not as easy as it sounds. Just like any other business venture, opening a clothing store can indeed be tricky. This is the reason why you need to have a clothing store business plan. Your business plan will serve as your guide as you go through the twists and turns of starting your own fashion and clothing store. Here are some factors that you must consider and include in your plan.

How much capital are you putting in? This is a very important aspect of the business plan. This will help determine how big and how extensive the business will be. This will also help determine how much merchandise you will be able to initially invest in. The capital stated in your clothing store business plan will also help determine several other important aspects of your store such as the location and the number of employees. A good location choice is important in ensuring the success of your business. Make sure that you are in a location where your market can easily access your products. At the same time, knowing how many people to employ will help you make a good projection for your costs. Know how much of the work you can do yourself in order to save costs.

Another important aspect to consider in your clothing store business plan is your target market. If you have yet to establish a name in the clothing and fashion retail industry, it is important that you first make your mark by focusing on a specific market. Are you selling clothes for women or men? Do you want to focus on kids’ clothing or perhaps you would be interested in selling clothes for babies and infants? Focus on a target market and be an expert on what they need as well as on the latest trends.

When making your clothing store business plan, it is also important to clearly envision how your business will run in next six to twelve months. This way you will be able to make a through list of your projected income and your projected expenses. List down the possible problems that you may encounter and how these problems can be resolved. There is nothing like being prepared for the worst.

Here’s How To Unlock Clothing Store At Home!

Opening a clothing store is the dream of many people and it feels so much different to be one’s own boss. However, those who want to open their own store should ask themselves questions like: how to open it? What style should the clothes be? How much money will it need to operate the store? It takes more than a thought to open a clothing store. People should consider the following aspects before opening the store.

First, why do you want to open a clothing store?

Some people are irrational when it comes to starting their own business, others are too rational and could not make the final decision, still others are the combination of the two types of people mentioned earlier, they are what we call romantic idealistic entrepreneurs. People should know why they want to open a clothing store before they actually open one.

Second, what are the odds of succeeding in starting one’s own business?

A research indicates that two out of ten people could succeed in starting their own business. Experts in this field believe that to succeed in opening clothing store, owners should make their business competitive, pay enormous attention to market change and adjust them to the new consumer cultural form in order to survive in the market.

Third, what kind of store to open?

Could you be able to provide an immediate answer when asked about what kind of store you want to open? If you are still confused about this, the following tips might help you make the final decision. You could consider opening a fashion pioneer store and create fashion trend if you are creative, passionate and willing to try new things. You could fill your store with exquisitely designed fashion items and clothes if you have a sharp and elegant taste in fashion. You could open a store selling clothes of average price if you tend to follow your feelings and put other people’s interest first.

Fourth, where should it locate?

The location of the store exerts direct influence on the profitability of the store. Therefore, owners should evaluate the surrounding environment of the store: is the transportation is convenient? Are the surrounding facilitates beneficial to the sales of the clothes? Is the population large in the surrounding area? Is the income of targeted consumers high? Owners are recommended to conduct detailed research about the location of the store before opening it.

Henley from Anita Pallenberg! 8 Vintage Treasures From Archive Stylist Bay Garnett Has Remade

There was something wildly inventive about West London fashion in the ’90s. The legendary vintage scene at Portobello Road Market, stretching from Golborne Road to Westbourne Grove, gave birth to the seemingly slapdash high-low mix that defines good street style to this day. Now, Bay Garnett, the British stylist who helped pioneer the secondhand movement, has partnered with M.i.h. Jeans to harness that magic for a new capsule collection that goes one step further than simple vintage-inspired designs. Instead, Golborne Road by Bay Garnett is a curated selection of thrifted treasures, plucked directly from her personal archive and reproduced for the masses.

These eight perfect pieces represent the crown jewels of Garnett’s expansive vintage collection, lovingly assembled on rambles through Portobello. “It was our way of life,” Garnett recalls of thrifting back then. “It was a really genuine, lovely passion that unified us.” From her home base in Shepherd’s Bush, she would set off for model Iris Palmer’s ramshackle house on the road and from there, the ragtag crew would embark on the hunt for rare, affordable finds—a soft cotton tee covered in glitter stilettos, or the elusive pair of perfect jeans. Many of those items found their way into Garnett’s editorial work—shoots for British Vogue, the pages of her cult thrifter’s zine Cheap Date—and sparked a collective desire for a more effortless, fun-loving wardrobe. “It could be dark red tracksuit bottoms with high heels and a swimsuit—almost quite Gummo, that film with Chloë Sevigny—or it could be a beautiful vintage silk dress,” Garnett says. “It didn’t matter what, it was about your own sense of style.”

That ethos feels particularly of the moment—one reason why M.i.h. founder Chloe Lonsdale, who also lived off Golborne Road in the mid-’90s, tapped Garnett for this collaboration. “I loved how people would pull out a ’30s silk tea dress, wear it over secondhand jeans and a pair of sneakers or Dr. Martens, and add a little twist of their own—jewelry, a hat,” she says. “Bay immortalized that look—what we see now as street style was single-handedly put on the map by her. It was that attitude toward dressing that I fell in love with.”

Happily, that attitude can be snapped up with one of Garnett’s vintage reproductions. Some are exact replicas (the black chinoiserie blouse with snaking buds up the collar), while others have been updated just slightly (a fleece turtleneck with elaborate ruffled sleeves, remade in soft jersey). Each has its own special history, laid out by Garnett, below—think a velour henley the color of mink, a gift from Anita Pallenberg, or those perfect flares, worn by countless It girls like Sevigny. They may be the holy grail of secondhand shopping, the sort of perfect high-waisted denim you can’t ever find new—at least, until now.

This is Why We’ll Never Kick Our Double Denim Addiction

In its ceaseless quest for fresh ideas, fashion adores the obscure, the forgotten and the extinct. Which is why the current double-denim trend is so troubling. If “total jeans” is shorthand for “working class” (i.e., not minimalist or maximalist but Marxist!), our sudden enthusiasm for it may mean that the proletariat has gone the way of the dodo.

Not convinced? When Chloé picked French party-girl/stylist Natacha Ramsay-Levi to take over the brand, she put out a picture of herself with lank hair, jeans and a frayed jean shirt. She looked like she’d been operating heavy machinery.

Sure, Tommy Hilfiger and Ralph Lauren dabble in denim-on-denim, but the rest of the fashion world is doubling down on it, too. A.P.C. produced a denim boiler suit. Vetements, Burberry, Yeezy, Off-White, Sacai, Y/Project and Ottolinger all did double dungarees. If next year’s Met Gala looks like a convention of the Third International, it will be because even Christian Dior, that purveyor of the leisure class, has caught the left-wing bug. “Not so long ago, I was wearing an Acne denim shirt, where the colour was light denim and the body was a tiny bit darker, along with vintage jeans, and everyone said, ‘You did denim-on-denim—that’s weird,’” says stylist Sheila Single, who co-founded the magazine honore. Now, it’s the height of chic to dress like a cowboy or a welder.

Designer Nicolas Ghesquière often takes his bows in jeans and a jean jacket. But for the rest of us, the Canadian tuxedo look stuck around only for a nanosecond. It has since shape-shifted from boot-cuts and Western shirts into couturish cuts, treatments and volume. “Denim has come a long way, of course, and it’s not only associated with factory workers anymore,” say Christa Bösch and Cosima Gadient of the Berlin-based brand Ottolinger. “People of all social classes wear denim and in all sorts of situations. We like it because of that. It’s timeless and basic. You can always wear denim.”

Y/Project is a brand that does high-society denim. Its jeans morph into thickly folded cancan frills at the shin. Off-White’s total denim look for Fall 2017 is overlaid with rust-coloured shirred tulle so that it looks dirty from afar and dainty up close. “Designers used denim in a new and clever way by changing it into prêt-à-porter,” says Single. “They used it in jackets and pants as a noble fabric, bringing in frills and zips and changing it to something less casual. Because it’s not classic shapes; it’s more modern. Now, it’s ‘haute couture.’”

Even the ordinary wear and tear on jeans has been riffed on. At Sacai, rips and tears were fancied up with zippers. Bösch and Gadient torched and poured acid on their denim: “It’s our own take on the garment and the fashion we do. It’s like discovering something new.”

Jeans used to be a no-brainer: what you threw on to do the laundry. Now, they send a message. It can be unexpectedly high-brow and refined or an ironic comment on the ordinary working man. With post-Brexit and U.S. election soul-searching, the demise of the latter has been the topic of many a dinner-party conversation—and now, it seems, on the runways, too.

Nike Team Associates With Virgil Abloh White

The sneaker giant is teaming up with the label’s designer, Virgil Abloh, on a special capsule collection which reimagines 10 iconic Nike styles, including the Air Jordan I, Nike Air Force 1 Low and the Nike Air VaporMax . Dubbed, “The Ten,” the collection will be divided into two themes: “REVEALING,” which is designed to look accessible (“hand-cut, open-source and reconstructed,” says Nike) and “GHOSTING,” designed with translucent uppers to “further the idea of revealing and unite the second set of silhouettes through common material.”

“What we’re talking about here is larger than sneakers, it’s larger than design culture,” 36-year-old Abloh, who, as a teen, sketched shoe ideas and mailed them to Nike, said in a press release. “It’s nothing short of state-of-the-art design. These 10 shoes have broken barriers in performance and style. To me, they are on the same level as a sculpture of David or the Mona Lisa. You can debate it all you want, but they mean something. And that’s what’s important.”

For the “REVEALING” collection, which includes includes the Air Jordan I, Nike Air Max 90, Nike Air Presto, Nike Air VaporMax and Nike Blazer Mid, Abloh used an X-ACTO knife to deconstruct and rework the styles. (“Yes, we’re making a desired product, but by making a trip to your local store, and using tools you have at home, you could also make this shoe,” he explained). This involved revealing foam within the shoes’ tongues (and moving their Nike labels), moving the Swoosh placements and adding pops of colour through orange tabs in various locations per shoe. He also added literal placements of text in Off-White’s signature Helvetica typeface, putting “AIR” on the Nike Air VaporMax, Air Jordan I and Air Presto and “SHOELACES” on the shoe string.

The “GHOSTING” set, which includes Converse Chuck Taylor, Nike Zoom Fly SP, Nike Air Force 1 Low, Nike React Hyperdunk 2017 and Nike Air Max 97, came afterwards, as a sort of “evolution to the reveal.”

According to Nike, Abloh’s turnaround on the collection was “one of the fastest collaborations Nike has ever completed” (10 shoes in roughly 10 months from ideation to release).

“Most of the creative decisions were made in the first three hours, while actual design and iteration took two to three days,” Virgil recalled. “The Jordan I was done in one design session. I work in a very like dream-like state. I see it, and it’s done.”

This isn’t the first time Nike has teamed up with a major fashion designer — last year, it collaborated with Riccardo Tisci, Louis Vuitton men’s designer Kim Jones andBalmain’s Olivier Rousteing.  However, this collection in particular is being viewed as a smart move on Nike’s part, according to the Business of Fashion.

“For Nike, it’s a comeback with a more long-term plan compared to what it used to be with one-off collaborations. They now see these natural people that have the right branding for them to align themselves with,” Yu-Ming Wu, founder of Sneaker News, told BOF.

And Abloh insists “The Ten” is more than “just another hypebeast project.”

“The future of streetwear is that it should no longer serve itself. This project is truly a democracy of how design explores the world,” he told BOF. “I’m interested in how the kid that’s standing outside his or her local Foot Locker or Nike Town buying Jordans and taking my ideas gets inspired and takes a marker to the shoes or attaches a red zip tie and now they’re part of the conversation.”

The first five icons of The Ten (“REVEALING”) will be pre-released at NikeLab stores in New York City (Sept. 9-13), London (Sept. 18-22), Milan (Sept. 21-25) and Paris (Sept. 26-30). The full collection including all 10 silhouettes will be available in November at NikeLab stores and select retailers worldwide.

Maria Sharapova Will Return to U.S. Open Wearing Riccardo Tisci Tennis

After serving a 15-month doping suspension, Maria Sharapova is set to make her first U.S. Open appearance next week — and she’s planning on doing it in style.

The former world No. 1 tennis pro will be outfitted in a chic little black (tennis) dress, designed in collaboration with Riccardo Tisci and Nike for her evening matches during the Grand Slam. According to Vogue, the dress features technical lace, eyelet-like perforations and Swarovski crystals. It also comes with a matching bomber jacket.

There’s a meaningful reason behind the dark hue, which quite literally the opposite of the typical white tennis garb: in 2006, Maria won the U.S. Open wearing a black dress.

“It was always going to be black,” 30-year-old Sharapova, who is currently ranked 148th in the world, told Vogue. “When I think of anywhere that I play, I want to bring a sense of elegance to the feeling that I have when I walk onto the court. That’s what I felt with the 2006 dress, and what I really wanted to relive in this dress is the moment of elegance and thinking of Audrey Hepburn and her classic Givenchy dress.”

Of the look, Tisci told Vogue he was “very happy” with the outcome. “It is very modern and pure. Everything is very geometric. The lace looks like the classic fishnet they use on tennis outfits, and the shape, the design is very pure. It’s very elegant, very minimal but at the same time very strong,” he said.

The partnership between the trio isn’t entirely surprising — Sharapova has been with Nike for more than 10 years, extending her contract by eight years for a whopping $70 million in 2010. And though Nike did cut the partnership short in 2016 following the doping scandal (Maria tested positive for the banned substance meldonium at the 2016 Australian Open, but she maintained she had been taking the drug for a decade to treat various health issues), they brought her back on after the Court of Arbitration for Sport cut Sharapova’s two-year ban to 15 months, stating it did not believe the tennis player’s doping was intentional.

Tisci, too, has collaborated with the sportswear giant in the past, first in 2014 with aspecial AF1 collection, and later in 2016 on a Dunk Lux High shoe and an athletic apparel collection with NikeLab.

Sharapova’s entire Tisci x Nike ensemble will be available for purchase on Aug. 26 in Nike stores, with the dress priced at $500 and the jacket at $700.

Some Things to Know About Hollywood’s Top Residents

One week after Forbes released their annual list of Hollywood’s highest paid actresses, they told us who the top earning actors were. You’ll never guess which group earned more. Or, you definitely will. Turns out, continuing their winning streak, men out-earned women. By a lot.

Emma Stone’s $26 million paycheque didn’t even come close to Mark Wahlberg’s impressive $68 million. Let that sit in: in 2017, the highest-paid actor in Hollywood made 2.6 times what the highest-paid actress did. When you compare the two lists as a whole, things look even worse. The 10 top-paid actors cashed a combined $488.5 million, almost 3 times their female counterparts’ collective $172.5 million.

As Forbes notes, this disparity has a lot to do with the jobs available: the lead roles in top-earning blockbuster franchises and superhero flicks almost always go to men. Wahlberg didn’t become the highest-paid actor working on critically acclaimed indie films; his poorly received role in Transformers: The Last Knight earned him his big bucks.

Following behind him on the list are Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, last year’s highest-paid actor, who pulled in $65 million, and Vin Diesel, whose role in eighth instalment of the Fast and Furious earned him $54.5 million. What do these top three guys have in common? They have big muscles. Also, truth be told,  they look pretty good next to explosions. Which, apparently, is how you make a lot of money these days.

“There are simply fewer parts for women that pay the sizeable backend profits that result in leading men’s large paydays, or the franchise sequels that permit aggressive negotiation for favourable deals,” Natalie Robehmed, Forbes associate editor, told The Telegraph. “According to a 2016 study, women comprise just 28.7% of all speaking roles in movies and only a quarter of roles for characters over the age of 40 – an ageism and lack of opportunity not facing Hollywood’s leading men. Until there are an equal number of high-paying roles, there will continue to be an inequality in the paychecks of Tinseltown’s very richest.”

The wage gap is bleak, but there is a redeeming light in Forbes list of grossly overpaid dudes: at least it was diverse. Last week’s round-up of highest paid actresses was comprised solely of American white women, while the men’s list includes three Bollywood stars, Jackie Chan, and multiple bi-racial actors. At least there’s progress somewhere.

Here’s Forbes full list of Hollywood’s top-earning stars.

1. Mark Wahlberg, $68 million
2. Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, $65 million
3. Vin Diesel, $54.5 million
4. Adam Sandler, $50.5 million
5. Jackie Chan, $49 million
6. Robert Downey, Jr., $48 million
7. Tom Cruise, $43 million
8. Shah Rukh Khan, $38 million
9. Salman Khan, $37 million
10. Akshay Kumar, $35.5 million
11. Chris Hemsworth, $31.5 million
12. Tom Hanks, $31 million
13. Samuel L. Jackson, $30.5 million
14. Ryan Gosling, $29 million
15. Emma Stone, $26 million
16. Jennifer Aniston, $25.5 million
17. Jennifer Lawrence, $24 million
18. Ryan Reynolds, $21.5 million
19. Matt Damon, $21 million
20. Jeremy Renner, $19 million
21. Chris Evans, $18 million
21. Melissa McCarthy, $18 million
23. Chris Pratt, $17 million
24. Mila Kunis, $15.5 million
25. Emma Watson, $14 million
26. Mark Ruffalo, $13 million
27. Cate Blanchett, $12 million
28. Julia Roberts, $12 million
29. Amy Adams, $11.5 million

“Movement Is on the Front Line of Every Decision”, is Move Venus Williams

Most professional athletes are accustomed to prioritizing function over form with the clothes they wear to compete. Of course, that’s a tough pill to swallow if you’re someone who cares about fashion, too. The best way to get you athletic-wear that does both? Do like Venus Williams and design your own. EleVen by Venus Williams, which she launched in 2007, includes tops and bottoms, plus a tennis-friendly line that the 37-year-old great will be sporting when she steps on the U.S. Open courts over the next few weeks.

After looking at some of the styles from her newest collection, Epiphany, ELLE.com connected with the pro for real tips on how she stays stylish without hampering her ability to win.

What do you consider when selecting and designing stylish pieces that also allow for ultimate athletic performance?

“It’s important I accomplish the vision for the season while never compromising performance. And fit is very important. It has to be perfect and ready to move with you no matter the workout. After that, I’m a firm believer that style depends on your mood. The Epiphany line is perfect for this season: It was inspired by confidence and determination, which you can see in the boldness of the pattern and color. She’s not afraid to unapologetically put her best foot forward. The Epiphany line also has our EleVen Pro-Dri fabric, which breathes to keep you cool. For comfort, I love our Seamless line. The pieces fit like a second skin. I wear something from Seamless everyday.”

Do certain colors or prints work best when you’re going to be seriously sweating?

“I don’t think you should ever hide sweat! It shows you have done the work—I wear it like a badge of honor. That being said, dark colors like black and light colors like white hide sweat best. Grey shows it the most. Typically patterns don’t show sweat.”

What don’t women consider when it comes to what they’re wearing to work out?

“As an athlete, I design with movement at the forefront of every decision. EleVen ensures all designs are appropriate for each endeavor, for appearance and efficiency. The fit has to be there so that what you’re wearing doesn’t distract you.Whether you’re running errands or a marathon, EleVen is designed to help you perform, to push your limits. Your focus is on your performance.”

What’s the relationship between your on- and off- court style?

“My look always reflects how I want to express myself. When I want to feel powerful on the court, I’m wearing strong, colorful pieces from my line, like our flutter skirt or the race day tank. How I see the world and my unbreakable, positive outlook on life—no matter the challenges I face—shapes the collection. It breathes positivity and optimism. It’s a message I want to pass to each new every woman who wears EleVen.

“Off the court, I’m addicted to dresses and skirts. I live in warm weather—I’m spoiled! I’m not immune to fashion faux pas though; I’ve had some regrets about what I’ve worn in the past. That said, I don’t dwell on those moments because I’m always focused on what’s next.”